Calvert Sheriff Police Beat HOT HEAD EX-CON SAID HE WOULD SHOOT IT OUT WITH THE COPS; TOOK AIM TO CARRY OUT HIS THREAT

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Calvert Sheriff Police Beat

HOT HEAD EX-CON SAID HE WOULD SHOOT IT OUT WITH THE COPS; TOOK AIM TO CARRY OUT HIS THREAT

Long record of child abuse and assault charges usually ends in plea deals with few consequences

Douglas Jones roared like a Lion and gave up like a pussycat threatened deputies with shootgun

HUNTINGTOWN, MD. – Douglas Jones talked real big until he was surrounded by deputies fully equipped and able to shut his big mouth once and for all. After a few rounds of allegedly bopping folks in his house in Calvert County, Jones was ready to shoot it out with the police when they showed up. He soon had his chance and instead, surrendered like a tamed pussycat, versus roaring like a lion.

Or as Calvert Sheriff Mike Evans put it this way:
On January 2nd, 2017, at approximately 3:27 p.m. deputies were dispatched to a residence located at 235 Ponds Wood Road in Huntingtown for a report of a man causing a disturbance while in possession of a firearm.  While units were responding, the suspect began to make threats to “shoot it out” with the police when they arrived.  Sheriff Evans reports that callers from the residence identified the suspect as Douglas Eugene Jones.  The callers advised police that Jones resides at the same house and had assaulted one of the other residents.       

Deputies arrived at the residence and observed Jones walking around the yard with a shotgun.  They immediately set up a perimeter and attempted to make contact with the suspect.  The deputies ordered him to put down the weapon several times.  However, he refused the requests and instead pointed the shotgun toward the deputies.  The deputies were able to stay behind cover and continue giving Jones verbal commands in an attempt to get him to surrender.  Eventually, the suspect placed the shotgun on the ground and was placed under arrest without injury.

Douglas Jones was subsequently charged with three counts of Assault First Degree, three counts of Assault Second Degree of a Law Enforcement Officer, and a Felon in Possession of a Rifle/Shotgun.   

Like many big mouths who allegedly beat up women and rape children, Jones was issued a warrant for domestic violence and ordered to stay away from the residence. A hearing is scheduled for Jan. 9, 2017.

Jones was charged with 12 counts of rape, sex offenses, assault, child abuse as a custodian of the minor and in a plea deal with the Calvert County States Attorney on August 28, 2006, he entered an Alford Plea. The plea meant that he admitted the prosecution had enough evidence to bury him under the jail for the rest of his life. The deal sentenced him to ten years on one of the child abuse charges, and all other charges were dropped. The deal suspended seven years of his term and resulted in him being incarcerated for three years in the Maryland State Prison in Hagerstown. Five years of probation were ordered following being released from prison.

In plea deals, the prosecutors just make deals with the defense attorney and no trial is held, and the prosecutor essentially just cuts a deal and doesn’t have to do any work. Defense attorneys really like to do business this way, and during elections for States Attorney, the prosecutors blather on about conviction records and how tough on crime they are in courtrooms.

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Jones isn’t a real big dude without a shotgun, standing at 5’6” and weighing 135 pounds. Therefore when he returns to Hagerstown Prison, he may wish he had a shotgun.  In the 2006 plea deal, he was represented by a taxpayer-provided public defender, who actually never defends the public but instead defends those charged with crimes, who usually commit mayhem and general turmoil against the public.

One such public defender, William McCarthy Davis, of Annapolis, was the lawyer for Jones in the child abuse conviction. Laura L. Martin was the Calvert County States Attorney.

Ironically, the plea deal and easy time in prison on the child abuse charge was not the first such event for Jones.

Calvert County States Attorney Laura L. Martin

On April 21, 2003, Jones was charged by indictment, at the time that Martin was Deputy States Attorney in Calvert County, with child abuse and third-degree sex offense. In a plea deal, that Martin undoubtedly was aware of in 2006, Jones entered a guilty plea to the sex offense and the prosecution dropped the child abuse charge. THE DEAL: Five years in prison with all five years suspended – and a big whopping five years of supervised probation, which clearly didn’t mean too much in the 2006 plea deal. Court records show that Laura Martin was the prosecutor and a public defender, Sheila Sullivan, cut the deal for Jones with Martin.

Jones entered a guilty plea to assault in Calvert County Circuit Court on Nov. 15, 2000, and picked up another deal for sixty days in jail, with all of the time suspended and unsupervised probation for two years. In plea deals, the prosecutors just make deals with the defense attorney and no trial is held, and the prosecutor essentially just cuts a deal and doesn’t have to do any work. Defense attorneys really like to do business this way, and during elections for States Attorney, the prosecutors blather on about conviction records and how tough on crime they are in courtrooms.

Jones was charged with DUI-drugs on May 30, 1999, at 1:35 am by a Calvert Sheriff’s Deputy. In a plea deal with the Calvert County States Attorney on Jan. 6, 2000, Jones was given 83 days in jail and a fine of $245.

Jones got another plea deal on a charge of battery filed by Maryland State Police Trooper Stephen Keen. On this charge, Jones pled guilty, and a charge of assault was dropped in Calvert County District Court on Sept. 11, 1995. THE DEAL: sixty days in jail with all the time suspended.

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