Ships, boats, places, people and ports of the Chesapeake tidewater region

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Coast Guard Eagle 3rd Class Andrew N. Ellis steers the ship on the Elizabeth River in Norfolk Va. Photo by PO 3rd Class Corinne Zilnicki

Coast Guard Cutter Eagle with Petty Officer 3rd Class Andrew N. Ellis as he steers the ship on the Elizabeth River in Norfolk Va. Photo by PO 3rd Class Corinne Zilnicki

The U.S. Coast Guard Cutter Eagle is shown sailing the waters of the Chesapeake Bay, near the city of Norfolk, Va., June 8, 2015. The Eagle's crew recently participated in the 39th Annual Norfolk Harborfest. (U.S. Coast Guard photo by Auxiliarist Trey Clifton)

The U.S. Coast Guard Cutter Eagle is shown sailing the waters of the Chesapeake Bay, near the city of Norfolk, Va., June 8, 2015. The Eagle’s crew recently participated in the 39th Annual Norfolk Harborfest. (U.S. Coast Guard photo by Auxiliarist Trey Clifton)

Coast Guard Cutter Eagle arrives in Norfolk, Virginia on July 22, 2016 Photo by Petty Officer 2nd Class Nate Littlejohn

Coast Guard Cutter Eagle arrives in Norfolk, Virginia on July 22, 2016 Photo by Petty Officer 2nd Class Nate Littlejohn

 

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The Steamer “Express” Baltimore’s largest excursion steamer shown on a postcard from the Mayor J. Harry Norris Collection.

McKay & Bohanan's Store and Post Office Park Hall, Md.

McKay & Bohanan’s Store and Post Office Park Hall, Md.

A tug boat similar to this one operating on the Potomac River at Piney Point was involved in the fatal crash on the Delaware River. THE CHESAPEAKE staff photo

A tug boat similar to this one operating on the Potomac River at Piney Point was involved in a fatal crash on the Delaware River. THE CHESAPEAKE TODAY staff photo

Tug working harbor at Baltimore, Md. THE CHESAPEAKE TODAY photo

Tug working harbor at Baltimore, Md. THE CHESAPEAKE TODAY photo

Tug time in Portland Maine. THE CHESAPEAKE TODAY photo

Tug time in Portland Maine. THE CHESAPEAKE TODAY photo

Tugboat Chief at Norfolk, Va. THE CHESAPEAKE TODAY photo

Tugboat Chief at Norfolk, Va. THE CHESAPEAKE TODAY photo

This tugboat is in port at Cannes, France. THE CHESAPEAKE TODAY photo

This tugboat is in port at Cannes, France. THE CHESAPEAKE TODAY photo

One man's office is another's tugboat. THE CHESAPEAKE TODAY

One man’s office is another’s tugboat. THE CHESAPEAKE TODAY

As free as the wind blows - born free to sail THE CHESAPEAKE TODAY photo

As free as the wind blows – born free to sail THE CHESAPEAKE TODAY photo

When a ship needs a tug on Potomac. This ship was towed down the Potomac River by the tug Pathfinder on June 16, 2016. THE CHESAPEAKE TODAY photo

When a ship needs a tug on Potomac. This ship was towed down the hazy Potomac River by the tug Pathfinder on June 16, 2016. THE CHESAPEAKE TODAY photo

Pop Duffy at Duffy's Tavern in Scotland Md. on the Chesapeake Bay shucking oysters.

Pop Duffy at Duffy’s Tavern in Scotland Md. on the Chesapeake Bay shucking oysters.

Mom and Pop Duffy at Duffy's Tavern at Scotland, Md.

Mom and Pop Duffy at Duffy’s Tavern at Scotland, Md. Home of the best oyster stew in tidewater Maryland.

A cold day on the bay for a trip to the can. FROM UNDERSIDE SHOWING OUTHOUSE AND FUEL TANK - Seven Foot Knoll Lighthouse, Mouth of Patapsco River, Riviera Beach, Anne Arundel County, MD

A cold day on the bay for a trip to the can. FROM UNDERSIDE SHOWING OUTHOUSE AND FUEL TANK – Seven Foot Knoll Lighthouse, Mouth of Patapsco River, Riviera Beach, Anne Arundel County, MD

Seven Foot Knoll Lighthouse bell Patapsco River at Chesapeake Bay

Seven Foot Knoll Lighthouse bell Patapsco River at Chesapeake Bay

 Significance: Built in 1856, the Seven-Foot Knoll Lighthouse was the second screwpile structure built by the U.S. Lighthouse Service. The present structure contains some elements of the original cast-iron structure, and the house dates from the late 19th Century. The light is historically linked to the development of the Port of Baltimore and sits beside one of the busiest shipping lanes on the East Coast. Technologically, the screwpile form illustrates Americans' ability to produce large cast-iron foundry castings, the same development that produced cast-iron architecture. In the period 1835-1860, Baltimore was a leading national center of this new metal-working technology and of new marine engineering techniques. Seven-Foot Knoll is, arguably, the most significant of the remaining screw-pile structures.

Significance: Built in 1856, the Seven-Foot Knoll Lighthouse was the second screw-pile structure built by the U.S. Lighthouse Service. The present structure contains some elements of the original cast-iron structure and the house dates from the late 19th Century. The light is historically linked to the development of the Port of Baltimore and sits beside one of the busiest shipping lanes on the East Coast. Technologically, the screw pile form illustrates Americans’ ability to produce large cast-iron foundry castings, the same development that produced cast-iron architecture. In the period 1835-1860, Baltimore was a leading national center of this new metal-working technology and of new marine engineering techniques. Seven-Foot Knoll is, arguably, the most significant of the remaining screw-pile structures. Library of Congress.

Harpers Ferry West Virginia John Brown's Fort monument

Harpers Ferry West Virginia John Brown’s Fort monument

Workers at Bethlehem Steel Shipyard on their way to work in 1943 in Baltimore, Md. Photo by Marjory Collins

Workers at Bethlehem Steel Shipyard on their way to work in 1943 in Baltimore, Md. Photo by Marjory Collins

Norfolk Little Creek Ferry and Old Point Norfolk Steamer waiting line 1940 Photo by Jack Delano

Norfolk Little Creek Ferry and Old Point Norfolk Steamer waiting line 1940 Photo by Jack Delano

Cars and trucks waiting at the Little Creek terminal to travel on the Cape Charles Virginia Ferry 1940 Photo by Jack Delano

Cars and trucks waiting at the Little Creek terminal to travel on the Cape Charles Virginia Ferry 1940 Photo by Jack Delano

Waiting for the Cape Charles Ferry to Norfolk 1940 photo by Jack Delano

Waiting for the Cape Charles Ferry to Norfolk 1940 photo by Jack Delano

Florida migrant's car at the Norfolk-Cape Charles ferry. Photo by Jack Delano 1940. LoC

Florida migrant’s car at the Norfolk-Cape Charles ferry. Photo by Jack Delano 1940. LoC

Cape Charles Virginia Eastern Shore Coast Guard Station. THE CHESAPEAKE TODAY photo

Cape Charles Virginia Eastern Shore Coast Guard Station. THE CHESAPEAKE TODAY photo

THE CHESAPEAKE TODAY photo Enter to win a Kindle Paperwhitehttp://theprivateerclause.com/

The Everett Theater in Middletown, Delaware, is one of more than a half dozen movie theatres restored and providing entertainment. THE CHESAPEAKE TODAY photo

The Everett Theater in Middletown, Delaware, is one of more than a half-dozen movie theaters restored and providing entertainment. THE CHESAPEAKE TODAY photo

 

The Courtney Thomas, the daily mail boat to Tangier Island, Virginia, loads freight at Crisfield, Md. THE CHESAPEAKE TODAY photo

The Courtney Thomas, the daily mail boat to Tangier Island, Virginia, loads freight at Crisfield, Md. THE CHESAPEAKE TODAY photo

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The streets of Middletown are dressed up for Christmas. THE CHESAPEAKE TODAY photo

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Downtown Crisfield, Md. A shadow of its glory days when King Oyster reigned. THE CHESAPEAKE TODAY photo

Downtown Crisfield, Md. A shadow of its glory days when King Oyster reigned. THE CHESAPEAKE TODAY photo

The Eagle has landed. He dare not roost here when the Osprey are in town. THE CHESAPEAKE TODAY photo

The Eagle has landed. He dare not roost here when the Osprey are in town. THE CHESAPEAKE TODAY photo

 

Coles Point Tavern located in St. Mary's County, Md. at the Virginia shoreline. THE CHESAPEAKE TODAY photo

Coles Point Tavern located in St. Mary’s County, Md. at the Virginia shoreline. THE CHESAPEAKE TODAY photo

Cole’s Point Tavern in St. Mary’s County, Md. has a liquor license that requires a Sheriff’s Deputy to inspect to ensure rules are adhered to arrive by boat. One can figure how often that happens. The bar also is governed by Maryland laws but once hell-raisers walk to the shore they are in Virginia. Why? Even though Maryland legislators in a bill sponsored by the late Sen. J. Frank Raley Jr., gave away total control of fishing rights when they created the Potomac River Fisheries Commission, Maryland retains ownership of the river to Virginia shoreline — courtesy of the King of England when he granted the charter to Lord Baltimore.

Most of the barflies in this tavern may not know and likely don’t care. In some years past the distant High Sheriff signed some sort of mutual aid pact with the Virginia side posse to respond to emergencies when they should have just had bad guys walk the plank.

When slot machines were legal in Southern Maryland, the bars with piers connecting them to Virginia had Maryland slot machines. In later years, the Maryland Lottery was and still is available, long before Virginia had a lottery. Maryland has always been good with vice and dice. THE CHESAPEAKE TODAY photo. More about the Chesapeake and Southern Maryland in The Chesapeake: Legends, Yarns & Barnacles…in eBook, paperback, and Audiblehttp://www.amazon.com/Chesapeake-Legends-Yarns…/…/B00LMLVU28

C & O Railway Newport News showing the Virginia starting on her trip to Norfolk.

C & O Railway Newport News showing the Virginia starting on her trip to Norfolk.

C & O Railway Newport News showing the Virginia starting on her trip to Norfolk.
C & O Railway terminal at Newport News, Va. Courtesy of collection of Mayor J. Harry Norris. Enter to win Kindle Paperwhite Giveaway.

USS Chesapeake

USS Chesapeake

USS CHESAPEAKE, frigate, 36 guns, 1244 tons, keel laid 10 Dec. 1798, launched 2 Dec. 1799. Originally designed as a 44-gun frigate, one of five sister ships of the CONSTITUTION. The CHESAPEAKE was attacked by the British LEOPARD off Cape Henry in 1807 which affair led to the duel between Commodores James Barron and Stephen Decatur, and was one of the causes leading to the War of 1812. She was captured off Boston, 1 June 1813, by the British frigate SHANNON, on which occasion her commander, Capt. James Lawrence uttered his celebrated dying words, “Don’t Give Up the Ship”, which have become a tradition in the Navy. The CHESAPEAKE was taken into the Royal Navy and, in 1820, broken up at Portsmouth, England, her timbers being used to build a flour mill at Wickham. Painting by F. Muller. Enter to win Kindle Paperwhite

Weekend warrior. This sailboat heads out the Potomac for a weekend sail on the Chesapeake Bay. THE CHESAPEAKE TODAY photo

Weekend warrior. This sailboat heads out the Potomac for a weekend sail on the Chesapeake Bay. THE CHESAPEAKE TODAY photo

Weekend Warrior headed south to Point Lookout. THE CHESAPEAKE TODAY photo See more of tales, boating, and stories from Pepper Langley, Larry Jarboe, Fred McCoy and more in The Chesapeake: Legends, Yarns & Barnacles 

 

 

 

Cardinal Gibbons Institute main building, Ridge, Maryland

Cardinal Gibbons Institute main building, Ridge, Maryland

Cardinal Gibbons Institute, Ridge, Maryland was a Colored Catholic School in St. Mary’s County. The Cardinal Gibbons Institute was St. Mary’s County’s first high school built to educate Blacks. Located in Ridge, Maryland, it provided academic, vocational and religious instructions to black students from across the United States.-

In May 1917, the land was acquired for the school. Archbishop James Cardinal Gibbons of Baltimore, Maryland donated $8,000 towards the purchase of the land. Consequently, the new school was named after the Archbishop – Cardinal Gibbons Institute.

The Knights of Columbus National Board of Directors donated $38,000 towards the erection of the school building. In February 1922, Archbishop Michael J. Curley of Baltimore, Maryland approved the general plans of the Institute.

Cardinal Gibbons Institute was opened in September 1924 and dedicated in October 1924. Victor and Constance Daniels were hired as the Institute’s first principal and assistant principal. The Institue’s first graduating class held its commencement in June 1929.

Financial difficulties resulting from the Great Depression reportedly caused the closing of Cardinal Gibbons in 1933. Cardinal Gibbons was reopened by Father Horace B. McKenna in 1936. Nathan A. Pitts was hired as the Institute’s principal in 1936. In September 1952, the Oblate Sisters of Providence began their instruction at Cardinal Gibbons Institute under the direction of Mother Mary Anselm Bentley.

In June 1967, the last graduating class held it’s commencement, The school was closed due to new Maryland state laws regarding segregated education. In April 1972, Cardinal Gibbons Institute, also known as the Cardinal Gibbons High School, long abandoned and vandalized, was torn down. In June 1997, the first Cardinal Gibbons Institute/High School class reunion was held.
Information from St. Peter Claver Church, St. Inigoes, Md. Enter to win Kindle Paperwhite.

At 6 pm on one Saturday each month the great buffet at Fitizies Marina opens with fried oysters, steamed shrimp, roast beef and more. Some folk were out side waiting with jackets and sweater but reserving seats like this. Fitzies is located at the end of Joe Hazel Road in Compton. Set it on your GPS. Enter to win Kindle Paperwhite. http://bit.ly/1H52GVs

FITZIES at FIVE – THE CHESAPEAKE TODAY photo

At 6 pm on one Saturday each month the great buffet at Fitizies Marina opens with fried oysters, steamed shrimp, roast beef and more. Some folk outside were waiting with jackets and sweater but reserving seats like this. Fitzies is located at the end of Joe Hazel Road in Compton. Set it on your GPS. Enter to win Kindle Paperwhite. http://bit.ly/1H52GVs

The drawbridge at Chincoteaque, Virginia THE CHESAPEAKE TODAY photo

The drawbridge at Chincoteague, Virginia THE CHESAPEAKE TODAY photo

Leonard Copsey's Seafood Market ready to go case

Leonard Copsey’s Seafood Market ready to go case

Leonard Copsey’s Seafood Market on Rt. 5 in New Market Md., is open again for the season. Fresh fish, crabs, shrimp and oysters. Call ahead for orders prepared and waiting. This photo shows prices the day photo was taken. Call PeeWee for today’s price and place an order at 301-884-9529 THE CHESAPEAKE TODAY photo. See story http://bit.ly/1R6PiQp

Capt. Joe Lore's fishing fleet at Solmon's Island Md. Times Herald Photo

Capt. Joe Lore’s fishing fleet at Solomon’s Island Md. Times Herald Photo

OYSTERS, CRABS YIELD, RICHES AT SOLOMONS

J. C. Lore Sends Fleet to Gather Output of Chesapeake

By Eugene Warner
The Washington Times-Herald
SOLOMON’S ISLAND, MD. (Sept. 7, 1939) – Sometimes you have to go a long way to find out what you want to know. Look at Columbus. I had to come way down here to find out we’re going to have the best oysters in 12 years this season. So, everybody in Washington, get your palates on edge for the fattest, tastiest oysters in years. Yummy! Please pass the lemon.
J. C. Lore, 76, pipe stuck in his yellowish gray moustache, specs on his forehead, the oldest fisherman on the island – and the most prosperous – gave me the good news in his spotless, white fish and oyster packing plant hard by the Patuxent.
Tidings Confirmed
His son, G. I. Rupert Lore, who weighs close to 225 and who calls himself Dick, confirmed the tidings. Another son, Joe, was too busy getting ready for the coming season to waste time talking to a reporter.
“I been in the business all my life and I can’t figure out what make’s ‘em good,” the old man said. “Sometimes they are, sometimes they aren’t, but this year’s crop, for some reason I can’t explain, is a jim-dandy. Fat, clean of spawn, healthy. They’re fine. Best in years.”
Bobbing at the end of the dock were five new boats, ready were the tongs, which look like two long-handled garden rakes fixed together scissorwise, and all that was stopping action was the absence of an “r” in the month. That “r” business is silly, now that we have refrigeration. Oysters are as good to eat in the summertime as clams, but the superstition prevails in Maryland. In other areas, they eat oysters the year ‘round.
Crab Season Over
The crab season is just about over. All summer long the Lores b buy crabs from boys and fisherman up and down the Bay which is literally crawling with the pale, green little fellows. Anybody can catch enough for a meal with only a butterfly net and boat in a half hour. Every season they sell 12 to 15 thousand dozen crabs. I hope you don’t have a nightmare tonight trying to visualize them.
They make a lot of money out of oysters and crabs. Free raw material. All you have to do is go out and get it. Their business in a relatively short time has grown from a little seaside operation to a business serving customers around the nation. They operate from several ports with a fleet of boats (they’re all brand new cruisers, good enough to be called yachts), a fleet of trucks which deliver as far away as Madison, Wis., Detroit, Cincinnati, Cleveland, New York and Miami with Washington the principal market; the business supports three families handsomely. In the spring, the shad come. Last spring the Lores nettined 250,264 pounds of fish and sold them.They shuck and sell 85,000 bushels of oysters a year, getting six pints to the bushel. Ice is the keynote of the business; the seafood is kept iced constantly from river-bottom to dinner plate.
“We used to catch sturgeon around here,” old J. C. recollected. “and we’d get several water buckets full of
roe from each one. All I did for eleven weeks a year was pack caviar, but it doesn’t do me any good because the sturgeon are all gone. Haven’t seen one in years.” …

MORE in The Chesapeake; Oyster Buyboats, Ships & Steamed Crabs now available in paperback and Kindle at Amazon.http://amzn.to/1GxZcuP

Boating on the Chesapeake Bay and its tributaries ranges from kayaks to yachts. THE CHESAPEAKE TODAY photo

Boating on the Chesapeake Bay and its tributaries ranges from kayaks to yachts. THE CHESAPEAKE TODAY photo

The historic Dover Bridge over the Choptank River at Talbot County. THE CHESAPEAKE TODAY photo

The historic Dover Bridge over the Choptank River at Talbot County. THE CHESAPEAKE TODAY photo

The Eastern Shore Railroad has changed hands many times and runs from Cape Charles to Wilmington, Del., with freight service. Efforts to bring back passenger service appear from time to time, with proposals such as a Dinner Train. This is the entrance to the University of Maryland Eastern Shore campus. THE CHESAPEAKE TODAY photo

The Eastern Shore Railroad has changed hands many times and runs from Cape Charles to Wilmington, Del., with freight service. Efforts to bring back passenger service appear from time to time, with proposals such as a Dinner Train. This is the entrance to the University of Maryland Eastern Shore campus. Some bozo thought it was a good idea to block the visibility of the warning signal with a sign that says “Exhale”. THE CHESAPEAKE TODAY photo

Illusion and Capt. Ralph at port in Chincoteague, Va. THE CHESAPEAKE TODAY photo

Illusion and Capt. Ralph at port in Chincoteague, Va. THE CHESAPEAKE TODAY photo

Great days on the Bay from Buzz's Marina

Great days on the Bay from Buzz’s Marina