Summertime Fishing Transition: Bowfishing

Working it out on land in daylight pays off for nighttime fishing for Cap'n Larry.  THE CHESAPEAKE TODAY photo

Working it out on land in daylight pays off for nighttime fishing for Cap’n Larry. THE CHESAPEAKE TODAY photo

Often times when the weather is hot, the fishing is not. Regardless of where you fish, be it a farm pond or the Atlantic Ocean, the best catching in July and August is usually either early in the morning or during the evening through sunset and into the night.

The most important challenge is to pick a time when the tide is moving during those times when the sun is not so high in the sky.

Catfish Bill Davis recently e-mailed me about putting some more catfish in his freezer. He had donated the last of his fillets toward my fundraiser and was ready to catch a mess more.

Now, Catfish Bill is one of those fortunate naval contractors who gets every other Friday off. Thus, July 11 is the best day other than the weekend which I generally avoid.

A quick Internet trip to the Maryland DNR Tide Finder site showed me that at 2:30 in the afternoon on July 11 the tide is high at Benedict which is closest to Indian Creek. That means the tide will be flowing out from about 3:30 PM till sunset. Those four hours tucked up in Indian Creek should put the maximum number of catfish in the boat for the effort we have expended.

However, since the tide that day is flowing out at the crack of dawn till about 9:00 AM, I might as well launch the boat at daybreak, catch a mess of croaker, perch, and spot as well as a couple Striped Bass out in the Patuxent River, tie the boat up at the community pier, and cool off during the heat of the day filleting my catch and drinking iced tea. Maybe, I’ll slip in a nap just after lunch.

Friday fishing revealed fish found swimming in river by Catfish Bill Davis. THE CHESAPEAKE TODAY photo by Cap'n Larry Jarboe

Friday fishing revealed fish found swimming in river by Catfish Bill Davis. THE CHESAPEAKE TODAY photo by Cap’n Larry Jarboe

And, the boat is prepped and ready for our catfish run that evening.

Dee by Gawd, life don’t get no better.

This summer, the Blue Crabs have been not only scarce. They are terribly expensive as well. It would upset my stomach to pay sixty dollars a dozen to eat crabs. Who would pay five bucks for a crab?

Usually, while fishing baited bottom rigs, we pick up about a half dozen crabs that fall off at the surface. This summer, the crab net is positioned close by in the boat to dip those big Jimmies. Would you let a five dollar bill float away?

Also, the most successful summertime anglers are actually archers who are putting hundreds of pounds of fish flesh into their coolers while most of us are sleeping. The sport of bowfishing is quickly growing in Southern Maryland. During the day, Cow-nosed Rays are usually targeted. At night, the more delectable invasive snakehead fish and Blue Catfish are more easily seen in the floodlights.

We are most fortunate to have so many fishing options in Maryland to get through the heat of the summer. Armed with the right knowledge, you can catch a cooler full of fish during the summer doldrums and stay cool as well.

Larry Jarboe – bass21292@yahoo.com

Available in eBook, paperback and now in Audible.

Available in eBook, paperback and now in Audible.

 

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